Yellow Springs 2.0

Walkable Village / Global Village / Cyber Village

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When Martin Luther King came to Yellow Springs

January 17th, 2011 · Histories

"Martin Luther King Jr. said that solving the problems of racial injustice, poverty and war were the leading challenges of the day during his address at Antioch’s commencement ceremony on June 19, 1965." [Photo and caption via Yellow Springs News]Photo via Yellow Springs News: “Martin Luther King Jr. said that solving the problems of racial injustice, poverty and war were the leading challenges of the day during his address at Antioch’s commencement ceremony on June 19, 1965.”

WYSO will broadcast its MLK documentary at noon and 7:00 p.m. today. You also can listen to an on-demand stream:

In 1965 Dr, Martin Luther King gave the commencement speech at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Ten year-old Jalyn Jones Roe was there and that day changed her life. Roe’s story will be heard as WYSO public radio presents Dr. King’s address, in its entirety.

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If You See Colette, Please Send Her Home!

July 27th, 2010 · Family

I don’t have a photo of Colette, but she resembles the cat below. The hair length and color  pattern is similar with the difference that Colette has gray patches on both eyes.

I’ve been heart-broken since the disappearance of my insouciant cat, Colette, on Friday night. She was last seen in the vicinity of the former Village Building (also called Union School House) in Yellow Springs. I didn’t find her at Greene County Animal Control on Sunday. I hope the neighborhood red-tailed hawk didn’t grab her, although I think she was as much of a threat to the hawk as vice versa.

Colette is 1 to 2 years old, a friendly female cat. She was spayed in March 2010 and may still show surgery scars. She is gray on top with black stripes (a gray tabby) with white below and white paws. Her tail is gray with black horizontal stripes. She’s quick to purr, and her vocalization sounds a lot like a Siamese cat. I think she sounds like Lauren Bacall after too many cigarettes.

I don’t have a photo of Colette, but she resembles the cat above. The hair length and color  pattern is similar with the difference that Colette has gray patches on both eyes.

So please help me find her! Email me at:

mark (at) yellowsprings20 (dot) com

or leave a message on my Google Voice number at 937-696-9455. Many thanks!

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Robert Whitmore: A Devoted Sense of Place

April 22nd, 2010 · Creatives

Robert H. Whitmore. Licking Valley. 1919. Dayton Art Institute.
Robert H. Whitmore. Licking Valley. 1919. Dayton Art Institute.

I don’t know whether this painting is in the Robert Whitmore exhibition mounted now at Antioch College’s Herndon Gallery, but there are few Whitmore images on the web, and it would be a travesty to write about this influential Yellow Springs painter without some sort of visual representation of his work. Licking Valley is part of the permanent collection at the Dayton Art Institute, and it graced the cover of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, in 2008. I first wrote about it then:

I had the privilege to know Bob Whitmore at the end of his long, creative life. His son John is a good friend. They were my neighbors when I lived at the Mill. I was one of a group of helpers who cared for Bob at home after he broke a hip in 1978. I remember sitting with him one winter afternoon when he talked and dozed in a bed just a few feet from his studio. The wall beside the bed was covered with the paintings he kept for himself over a 60-year career. One of them, a bright seascape painted at Cape Cod in1919, hangs in my bedroom today.

I would have liked to attend the opening of “Robert Whitmore: A Devoted Sense of Place” on April 10, but I was in Toronto for a wedding. I saw John at the YS farmer’s market last Saturday. He told me that the exhibition runs until sometime in May. Located in South Hall on the Antioch campus, The gallery is open from 1:00–4:00 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays and 7:00–9:00 p.m. on Thursdays.

About Robert Whitmore [via A Yellow Springs Blog]:

Robert H. Whitmore was born in Dayton in 1890 and attended the Art Institute of Chicago from 1913-1917 where he studied drawing, painting, sculpture and anatomy, as well as architecture, illustration, and woodcarving. Whitmore taught at the Dayton Art Institute from 1920-23 where nineteen of his works remain in the permanent collection. During this period he developed his printmaking skills as a member of the Dayton Society of Etchers. With his wife, Elizabeth Ann Bennett, and their five children he lived in a house outside of Yellow Springs that was formerly owned by Horace Mann, first President of Antioch College

In 1925 Arthur Morgan, president of Antioch College, asked Whitmore to join the Department of Art where he enjoyed a long and distinguished teaching career until his retirement in 1955. Whitmore was a man of many talents and he remained an active artist up until his death at age 89 in 1979. In the words of Don Wallis, from an earlier exhibition review: “As an artist he grounded his work—as he grounded his life—in his devoted sense of place.”

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Knit Graffiti by the Jafagirls

April 18th, 2010 · Creatives

The Jafagirls gave me a guided walking tour of their textile art installations. Some of it is in this video montage, and some of it I had seen (and touched) before, but I had no sense of the scope of their project until they took me around the block, literally. I’ll have more to say about it. For now, I am thrilled that I don’t have to pine for street art in Paris (à la Miss Tic and the Ethics of Love). I can stroll anytime to the end of Dayton Street. It’s a perfect place for flânerie. Thanks, Corrine and Nancy!

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Bald Eagles Nest At Eastwood Lake

April 14th, 2010 · Naturalist at Large

Bald eagle pair near their nest in 2009. The pair have been named Jim and Cindy. [Photo source: Boonshoft Museum of Discovery]
Bald eagle pair near their nest in 2009. The pair have been named Jim and Cindy. [Photo source: Boonshoft Museum of Discovery]

Brendan sent me a text message this morning about a live webcam of bald eagles nesting at Eastwood Lake in Riverside. One search on the web and I found a Dayton Daily News story and the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery’s eagle page:

Throughout the 2010 nesting season, the Boonshoft Museum will host live video streaming of Dayton’s resident Eagle pair “Jim” and “Cindy,” and provide updates on the couple using input of the Eastwood Eagle Watchers.

Designed to bring a birds-eye view of these iconic raptors to the public, EagleCam is perched on a tower nearly 800 feet away from the Eagle’s nest. As the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act makes it illegal to disturb Bald Eagles in any way, EagleCam was planned to bring images of these amazing birds to the public in a safe way, providing unique access to Eagles in the wild.

Watch live EagleCam

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